Tag Archives: Obesity

Eating Healthy: Small Steps for Big Results


Happy Thanksgiving
Image by faith goble via Flickr

Healthy eating doesn’t sound like the right topic for a holiday-season blog, but healthy eating is a gift to yourself: it can protect you from disease and give you the gifts of better health and longevity.  Just a few simple changes can help a woman dodge some significant health threats.

Choose whole grains instead of refined ones.  Studies indicated that 3 servings of whole grains per day can lower the risk of heart disease by up to 36%.  Whole grains provide fiber and antioxidants like selenium and vitamin E.  These work to reduce inflammation, and lower both cholesterol and blood pressure.  Use brown rice instead of white.  It has twice the fiber and will make you feel fuller, longer thus helping your diet.  Grab an oatmeal raisin cookie instead of a chocolate chip, and eat wheat crackers instead of normal saltines.

Include protein with every meal.  Doubling your protein intake will help you shed those unwanted pounds, as well as lessen your risk of Alzheimer’s, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and more.  Amino acids in protein send signals to the brain that reduce the appetite.  Protein also has the highest thermogenic effect…it requires more calories to digest protein than other foods.  You could lose an additional 70 calories a day (equivalent to 8 pounds a year) with no effort.  Studies indicate that if you are serious about losing and maintaining weight loss, 5-6 small meals per day focusing around quality protein intake can substantially decrease your weight, increase your energy while energizing you as well.

Drinking 3 glasses of fruit or vegetable juice in the morning can slash your risk of Alzheimer’s by 76%.  Polyphenols in fruit and vegetable skins and pulp buffer brain cells from oxidative damage.  Just be careful of juices loaded with sugar, or juices that really offer very little actual juice.

Peppers, oranges, peaches, and papaya are loaded with beta cryptoxanthin; a carotenoid that reduces the risk of lung cancer by up to 30% says the American Cancer Research Institute.  It neutralizes free radicals so they can’t damage the DNA, and it keeps the growth of any cancer cells that do develop, under control.

Stop sipping on sodas…Tufts University says that soda is the biggest source of calories in the American diet.  Drinking just one soda a day can put on 14 pounds in a year and can up your risk of having type-2 diabetes by 83%.  Jazz up your water with fresh squeezed lemons or limes, sliced apples or cucumbers.  Adequate hydration can also lessen your can of suffering a heart attack by 50%.

Eat dark chocolate.  It hardens tooth enamel and prevent tooth decay.  In fact an extract in chocolate rights cavities better than fluoride according to Tulane University.

Be safe, be healthy, find a quality protein supplement, take your WomenVitamins, and be blessed, Kersten

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Women Vitamins: To Sleep, Perchance to Live Longer & Better


Main health effects of sleep deprivation (See ...
Image via Wikipedia

Oh those blissful days of summer. We anticipate more sunshine, more vitamin D,  more pleasurable activities, and possibly less sleep.

We live away from the natural circadian rhythm of light and darkness that ruled our ancestors lives. We are sleeping less, at later times, thinking that we can make it up “some day.”

The truth is, we need sleep and  our body seems to work best with 7.5 to 9 hours of sleep…  We need to sleep during the darkest hours, and we need to sleep regularly.  Contrary to what you may tell yourself, there really is no making up lost sleep.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Americans slept an average of 9 hours, based on available light. Now  the average American sleeps 7.5 hours, a shortening mostly likely to accommodate more working hours or the pursuit of increased recreational and pleasure times.

6 or less hours of sleep falls under the label of sleep deprivation. Although we may get used to feeling fatigued or un-rested, the truth is that sleep deprivation aggravates and accelerates aging and ill-health. Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and memory loss are common symptoms of an un-rested life.

16 studies involving more than 1.3 million participants who were followed for up to 20 years, has revealed that people who sleep for less than 6 hours each night are more likely to die prematurely.

Professor Francesco Cappuccio, of the Sleep, Health, and Society Programme at the University of Warwick (UK) worked  with the Federico II University Medical School in Naples, Italy. His research found that people who slept less than six hours each night were 12% more likely to die prematurely than those who got the recommended 6-8 hours of rest.

Researchers also found that adults under 40 who typically slept for 5 hours or less each night had a greater accumulation of belly fat, both the “superficial” fat layers just below the skin and the “visceral” fat that surrounds the abdominal organs.  Research suggests that sleep loss alters people’s levels of appetite-regulating hormones — which could  account for the urge to overeat and it’s subsequent obesity.  Cortisol, (a stress hormone that stimulates the storage of fat cells, particularly around the waist area), is also activated by the lack of consistent sleep.

Tips for a good night’s sleep:

  • Get regular, daily exercise.  A study by Stanford University revealed that after 16 weeks of moderate exercise, participants fell asleep about 15 minutes earlier and slept about 45 minutes longer.
  • Stop eating after 7PM, and avoid before-bed snacks, particularly grains and sugars which raises blood sugar levels and inhibits sleep.
  • Eat a high-protein snack several hours before bed. Protein provides the L-tryptophan need to produce melatonin and serotonin, two components of good sleep.
  • Listen to relaxation cd’s, nature sounds, or white noises CD’s.
  • Avoid caffeine, alcohol, and most liquid drinks before bed.
  • Read something religious or spiritual, practice meditation and pray…all these ease the mind
  • Sleep in the dark, unplug electronics with LED red or blue lights, light interfers with the  pineal gland’s production of melatonin and seratonin…even a brief flash of light can disrupt this production.
  • Don’t watch TV before bed, and get your TV out of the bedroom. TV stimulates your brain and it will take longer to fall asleep.
  • During winter months, wear socks to bed. Cold feet affect the quality of your sleep. Wearing socks reduces night waking.
  • Get to bed fairly early.Your body does most of its repair and recovery between 11 PM and 1AM.
  • Keep your bedroom cool, somewhere around 70 – 74 degrees. Your sleep is disturbed if you are too hot.

Sleep well, sleep enough, stay healthy, take your women vitamins, and be blessed, Kersten

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Women Vitamins: Soda and the Sobering Truth


VINTAGE SODAS 4
Image by woody1778a via Flickr

I wrote a blog not too long ago about the sodas we drink in America and the terrible impact they are having on the health of our children.  I remember when I was growing up, my mom made a big deal out of a bottle of pop.  Not only did we not get our own, personal container (the liquid was carefully split between the my sisters and myself), but also we only got this rare treat every once in a while.  Not lying, maybe once a month if we were REALLY good….

I heard the  news a few weeks ago, that this generation, (the tweens, and pre-teens and early teens), are the first generation in almost forever, that will not live as long nor as well as their parents.  Whoa!  That was a sobering thought indeed.

What is causing this to happen?  Is it poor health care?  Poor quality food choices?  Too much daily caloric intake? Potentially hazardous vaccines and shots?  Not enough exercise?  Not enough quality sleep?  Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, and yes….

The obesity epidemic is running rampant. Take a good look at the children around you and really analyze their body’s condition.  Every day,  I watch kids at school pile out of their cars with sodas, power drinks, and high end coffee-based, sugar laden drinks in hand.  They feast predictably on pizza and chocolate chip cookies.  And wash it all down with slushies, chocolate milk, and fruit juices.

Simple carbohydrates are  digested quickly because the individual sugars are ready to be absorbed immediately.  This rapid absorption increases the chances of sugar converting to fat but only if there is an abundance of energy absorbed. Foods like cake, pastry, biscuits, chocolate and too much table sugar contain lots of  “empty” calories.
Because our cells usually do not require that amount of energy at that time, the sugar  converts to glycogen (sugar stored within cells ) or it is converted into fat.  Since cells can only store a limited amount of glycogen, simple carbohydrate loaded foods may contribute to body fat stores.

Sugar consumption, in the form of High Fructose Corn Syrup, has sky-rocketed, and high consumption of that leads to obesity, insulin resistance, high blood sugar levels, pancreatic cancer, bone density loss, heart, kidney and liver issues, and all other sorts of peripheral diseases.  Heavy intakes of carbohydrates do the same thing

Soda consumption acidifies the pH of our blood, erodes tooth enamel, packs on extra pounds.

What does our body really require?

We need water (hydration), green tea (antioxidant), some milk(calcium), a little coffee (antioxidant).  We need mental, spiritual, and physical exercises.

We need to care for ourselves and care for those in our care….from parents to schools to restaurants to extended families and churches….we ALL need to start modeling good behaviors and expecting good behaviors, whether we are at the dinner table or the mall.

Today while going through some of my health site emails, I saw this graphic and knew I had to use it …It presents amazing facts, so take the time to read it thoroughly.

The Stats on Soft Drinks
Via: Online Schools

Be safe, be healthy, take your Vitamins for Women, and be blessed, Kersten

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